LC 250 - Equipment Speculation

m1konrad

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Oct 20, 2023
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Minnesota
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We've got months of waiting to go but as we come into the end of 2023, I must poast while I still have time for irresponsible speculation. :) Anyway, I understand we're working with fairly limited info until Q1 2024 where I'm assuming a lot of this may be revealed but going through videos, comment sections, forums/Reddit, etc there hasn't been much at all for "insider" info on upcoming standard equipment for the LC250. Though I have come across a couple interesting items:

  • External Reservoir shocks: Independence Overland of YouTube, who has also gone to see and tour the GX550 and has a detailed video on the TrailHunter, is fairly certain that he noticed external reservoir shocks on the new Land Cruiser - something like the Old Man Emu BP-51. Video here - start 7:50 (very well-done video, imo). He grants that he hasn't heard this really pointed out and now that I think about it, I don't think anyone I've seen really went around the wheel to get a full look at the suspension configuration. Anyone catch any video that has confirmed either way?
  • Full-Floating rear axle: Alright, this one is more on the likely-unrealistic area of the speculating. :) I didn't see a direct comment from a content creator or an "insider" of any sort but there was a commenter on a video f/ Where to Next Overland here that I caught which mentions that the user has "twice" seen mention that the rear axle is full-floating. I asked about some links, and I went through videos that the user thought contained the info, but from all the videos I didn't hear anything about the full-float axle - only that the Land Cruiser will have the "larger" 9.25" axle that the TrailHunter will have. This user also mentioned that Kurt Williams (Land Cruiser Heritage Museum) made a comment for the full-float though I haven't been able to confirm. The only long-form commentary I came across Kurt's was a podcast he did w/ Texas Truck Channel but didn't get into the type of axle there. With all that non-confirmation said, I still wonder if this could be a thing? In my digging around, the first result that usually comes up is that the new Wrangler is actually switching to a full-float rear Dana 44 "HD" for 2024 and I wonder if it's not so unreasonable to think this could be a possibility. I'd say the Wrangler and LC250s are more of a "light duty" application (compared to common full-float applications such as 3/4 ton+ trucks and 70/80 series Land Cruisers) so I didn't really think there would be an economical case for it but now seeing the Wrangler get the full-float treatment, this subject has piqued my interest. Also, that 465 ft lb torque in the 2.4 Hybrid certainly makes a case for a full-float.
Conclusion for the two items listed: In regard to the suspension for my own usage case, I really would rather not rip out a brand-new suspension in order to lift it so I'm probably sticking w/ the stock unit for the long haul. I'd rather get good use out of the OEM setup before finally switching to a lift (w/ 35s? - though a lift w/ the 33s would only help) when the shocks/springs should be replaced anyway. With that said, I would consider a TRD/OEM lift "kit", if available at purchase though I probably still wouldn't go that direction if I can't get at least some credit for my OEM setup I'm "throwing away". If the LC250 comes factory with external reservoir shocks, that just sweetens the deal in my usage case of wanting to use the OEM equipment. Note - I get that the LC250 appears to take 33s with no problem

As for the full-floating rear axle, that's probably more of a "value added" item that I will take into account when considering the purchase price. Again, it's a "light duty" rig so it's arguable a full-float isn't really necessary but I'll take all the HD equipment they'll give me. :) Further, w/ a full float, I'm assuming that would help payload a bit.

Anyone else hear any little birds about available equipment on the LC250? We've got time to speculate. :)
 
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I am presuming Jeep is implementing a full-floater in some models to facilitate extremely over-sized wheels/tires? Of course an advantage of a full-floating axle is the ease of replacing an axle in the field. Has there been an issue with stock non-floater axles?
 
I am presuming Jeep is implementing a full-floater in some models to facilitate extremely over-sized wheels/tires? Of course an advantage of a full-floating axle is the ease of replacing an axle in the field. Has there been an issue with stock non-floater axles?
I haven't dug into any Jeep press-releases for their reasoning but the oversized set-up does appear to be an obvious plus. I'm not aware of any issues with the semi-float Danas they've always ran. Those were always great axles and the Bronco uses a Dana 44 rear semi-float as well. I've never heard of any issues on those except for aggressive, low speed wheeling and we're probably talking about older Dana 44s at that point. I'll note that it appears the Wranglers that get the full floats are the "Rubicon X" and the 392. I don't know about the X but the 392 puts out the torque to justify adding the full-float, I would imagine. But again, I'm not aware of any insufficiencies of the semi-float 44.

I wonder if we're seeing the result of what competition is doing to Jeep. Their Wrangler has been kind of on an island for a long time. Now w/ the off-roading/overlanding boom, the bar is being set higher for OEMs and that's good for all of us - getting OEM foundational upgrades that are probably cost-prohibitive to do after-the-fact.
 
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The LC 250 will have twin tube shocks up front, but I would not expect external reservoir shocks on any trim. Toyota has experience with full floating axels on motorhomes and large trucks, but I would be surprised to see a full-floater on the LC 250. Jeep Wranglers typically have modified axels and suspension to accommodate large wheels. I would check the 2024 Tacoma TRD Pro for insights on what suspension options are possible for the LC 250.

The LC 250 will be a high production volume vehicle, so I don’t expect we’ll see much that doesn’t already exist on another Toyota model; the stabilizer disconnect (probably a supplier part) is the only exception I’m currently aware of.
 
The LC 250 will have twin tube shocks up front, but I would not expect external reservoir shocks on any trim. Toyota has experience with full floating axels on motorhomes and large trucks, but I would be surprised to see a full-floater on the LC 250. Jeep Wranglers typically have modified axels and suspension to accommodate large wheels. I would check the 2024 Tacoma TRD Pro for insights on what suspension options are possible for the LC 250.

The LC 250 will be a high production volume vehicle, so I don’t expect we’ll see much that doesn’t already exist on another Toyota model; the stabilizer disconnect (probably a supplier part) is the only exception I’m currently aware of.
I'll certainly take twin-tubes in the front. As I understand, the LC250 has a bit of a bargain-basement set-up w/ the wheel/tire combo as Toyota is assuming it'll be popular to immediately swap to an aftermarket wheel/tire set-up - which is what I certainly would be doing. I was hoping that the same philosophy won't be applied to the suspension configuration as well.
 
The LC 250 will have twin tube shocks up front, but I would not expect external reservoir shocks on any trim. Toyota has experience with full floating axels on motorhomes and large trucks, but I would be surprised to see a full-floater on the LC 250. Jeep Wranglers typically have modified axels and suspension to accommodate large wheels. I would check the 2024 Tacoma TRD Pro for insights on what suspension options are possible for the LC 250.

The LC 250 will be a high production volume vehicle, so I don’t expect we’ll see much that doesn’t already exist on another Toyota model; the stabilizer disconnect (probably a supplier part) is the only exception I’m currently aware of.
About the axles, I'm a bit new to the Toyota ecosystem (I'm much more familiar w/ Ford). Does Toyota mfg all their own axles (both solid and IFS)? As I understand, the rear end will be the Toyota 9.25" but not sure about what Toyota does w/ the IFS axles up front. I know Ford outsources that to Dana for the Bronco w/ the larger M210 Advantek (Badlands & Sasquatch package) up front and the M220 axle in the rear w/ the Dana 44. I've always preferred to have specialists supply drivetrain parts for various applications - examples: Dana - drivetrain, Cummins - diesel, Allison - transmission, but I suppose if I'd trust any OEM in-house, it would likely be Toyota.
 
I'll certainly take twin-tubes in the front. As I understand, the LC250 has a bit of a bargain-basement set-up w/ the wheel/tire combo as Toyota is assuming it'll be popular to immediately swap to an aftermarket wheel/tire set-up - which is what I certainly would be doing. I was hoping that the same philosophy won't be applied to the suspension configuration as well.
Toyota consistently uses the lightest weight tires to certify the best fuel consumption ratings. Many millions are spent on fuel efficiency optimization during the design, so light tires preserve that investment. The suspension will meet Land Cruiser standards which I understand is the highest standard for Toyota considering all performance metrics. Bilstien shocks transformed my Jeep, but I don’t expect significant improvements on the LC 250 will as easy.

I’m not sure about rear axle sourcing for Toyota; I suppose it could be Aisin like the transmission.
 

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