Concerns About The Turbo

Rocket

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Aug 26, 2023
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Nashville, TN
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2014 FJ Cruiser
I have always heard that turbos cause earlier engine failure due to increased pressures on the engine. I, personally, have never had a turbo car for this reason. I know they generate more HP in smaller engines for better performance but that is usually at the cost of decreased engine life. Has anyone experienced anything different? Does anyone think Toyota has solved this problem? If so, how and why?

I really love the look of the new LC but I am concerned that this engine won't match up to the amazing engines of the past due to the turbo. Short term looks great. Long term...

Thoughts?
 
I suppose it depends on how much engine life one is expecting. A turbo Subaru once owned went well over 100K miles with no issues. However, this said, my opinion is that with a turbo engine it would be unrealistic to expect the 300K miles or greater many get from normally aspirated engines.
 
I suppose it depends on how much engine life one is expecting. A turbo Subaru once owned went well over 100K miles with no issues. However, this said, my opinion is that with a turbo engine it would be unrealistic to expect the 300K miles or greater many get from normally aspirated engines.
Well, with the Landcruiser name plate, I think 200K-300K miles is par for the course. If they put out something that gets over 100K then needs major work, I don't think they are close to the mark.
 
I think when turbos first came out and it was new technology this was a thing. Turbo applications are well understood and some platforms are built from the ground up with this entirely in mind. I don't have a problem with turbo cars. I like the increased HP and torque and the good gas mileage. I have absolutely no problems with them. Especially in diesel applications.
 
My old hilux 3.0litre d4d (turbo) has 280,000miles and still going strong, still own it.
Diesel? And all the diesel big rigs on the road are turbo. However, diesel fuel has lubricating properties, but not so with gasoline.
 
Diesel? And all the diesel big rigs on the road are turbo. However, diesel fuel has lubricating properties, but not so with gasoline.

Yes, but you shouldn't be getting gasoline or diesel fuel anywhere near your turbo impeller anyway :)
 
Yes, but you shouldn't be getting gasoline or diesel fuel anywhere near your turbo impeller anyway :)
I am thinking of the wear on pistons/rings, that it possibly will not be as severe with diesel engines?
 
Start at about the 6:15 mark when he starts to discuss turbos. Thoughts? This guy is seemingly very knowledgeable. This is the second video I have seen from him recently where he speaks out completely against turbos. Maybe a LC 200 is the way to go?

 
I have watched a LOT of his videos, and agree with the vast majority. Just be aware that he is a social media influencer and makes good money doing so.
 
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Yeah. I know. I just posted a question on his website asking him a similar question. Will be interesting to see if he responds or how other mechanics will respond as well.
 
Diesel? And all the diesel big rigs on the road are turbo. However, diesel fuel has lubricating properties, but not so with gasoline.
Yes diesel, but i bought my father inlaw a 335i bmw (petrol) its got 130,000miles and still going strong. I had to get the turbos reconditioned 12000miles ago and for me thats the negative of a turbo engine but i wouldnt be too worried about it exploding due to engine failure as long as you look after it and at worst recon the turbos
 
Diesel? And all the diesel big rigs on the road are turbo. However, diesel fuel has lubricating properties, but not so with gasoline.
Less lubrication since they reduced the sulfur level with ULSD. I think now even most of the red dye diesel is ULSD.
 
Yeah. I know. I just posted a question on his website asking him a similar question. Will be interesting to see if he responds or how other mechanics will

I wouldn't worry about it. Toyota has been making turbo engines since the 1980's outside of the North American Market. They know what they are doi

Less lubrication since they reduced the sulfur level with ULSD. I think now even most of the red dye diesel is ULSD.
Nevertheless, would sure like a diesel option here in the U.S. Never going to happen, but we can dream...
 
Nevertheless, would sure like a diesel option here in the U.S. Never going to happen, but we can dream...
I read somewhere that Toyota does not want to mess with all the EPA requirements. They do just fine without them in the rest of the world.
 
One has to remember that as I understand it, Sheldon Brown was also the chief engineer on the Tundra. It encountered early turbo issues, and worse yet, to service them the entire truck cab had to be removed.
 
One has to remember that as I understand it, Sheldon Brown was also the chief engineer on the Tundra. It encountered early turbo issues, and worse yet, to service them the entire truck cab had to be removed.
Great point. My understanding is the Tundra has an electronic waste gate controller whereas the Tacoma has a conventional vacuum operated waste gate.

I’m hopeful lessons learned on the Tundra will be incorporated in the LC 250. There will be issues after production begins, and I expect Toyota will be watching the initial in-service experience closely.
 
Great point. My understanding is the Tundra has an electronic waste gate controller whereas the Tacoma has a conventional vacuum operated waste gate.

I’m hopeful lessons learned on the Tundra will be incorporated in the LC 250. There will be issues after production begins, and I expect Toyota will be watching the initial in-service experience closely.
Now you have me thinking! Since I am also considering the 2024 Lexus GX, I am curious, since they also use essentially the Tundra drive train, if it also employs the electronic waste gates, and how they would be serviced on this vehicle?
 
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